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Google updates Word Search with sample sentences, synonyms and translation

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A small and useful update to Google Search word functionality will definitely be appreciated by logophiles. Don’t know the meaning of logophile? Don’t worry, Google it. You’ll also get to see what changes Google has brought to word search.

Google-word-search

Google Search for words now shows sample sentences, translations, synonyms, and word’s usage over time, spoken responses and links to sites such as Wikipedia, Dictionary.com and Answers.com for further information about the searched word. For those who don’t know about this function, you can get the meaning of any word by Googling “define + word” in Google Search. The updated search is available for desktop browsers but on mobile devices, a concise definition (see serene) is put in your face explaining the word’s meaning in different parts of speech and only a couple of synonyms to go with it.

Google noted in a Google+ post:

You may be familiar with using Google to find definitions, like [define fortuitous]. We’ve recently updated this feature on google.com on desktop and mobile to give you more information about these words beyond just their definition. Now you’ll also see sample sentences that highlight how the word is used, as well as synonyms. If you tap the microphone on your Google Search app, you’ll hear answers spoken back when you ask questions like “What’s the definition of fortuitous?” and “What are synonyms for fortuitous?”

define fortuituos

Google also allows you to translate the word from the result box directly into more than 60 languages. You can always set a default language so that it displays the transition in your preferred language each time. Google noted that the feature is available for both mobile and desktop, but like I declared above, I got a very rudimentary explanation on mobile. It might be getting rolled out region wise and might reach my mobile in sometime.

This is interesting not only for logophiles but also for bibliophiles who read on Play Books app. This is because Play Books app on the phone also pulls the meaning of the word from Google Search when you long tap on a word. We’ll keep an eye out for other changes as well and will keep you posted. Google also provides similar features like currency conversions, unit conversions, nutrition data, translations, dates, times and much more. We expect similar upgrades to those features in the weeks ahead.

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